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Tuesday, January 7
 

4:00pm EST

Bringing Science Data Uncertainty Down to Earth - Sub-orbital, In Situ, and Beyond
In the Fall of 2019, the Information Quality Cluster (IQC) published a white paper entitled “Understanding the Various Perspectives of Earth Science Observational Data Uncertainty”. The intention of this paper is to provide a diversely sampled exposition of both prolific and unique policies and practices, applicable in an international context of diverse policies and working groups, made toward quantifying, characterizing, communicating and making use of uncertainty information throughout the diverse, cross-disciplinary Earth science data landscape; to these ends, the IQC addressed uncertainty information from the following four perspectives: Mathematical, Programmatic, User, and Observational. These perspectives affect policies and practices in a diverse international context, which in turn influence how uncertainty is quantified, characterized, communicated and utilized. The IQC is now in a scoping exercise to produce a follow-on paper that is intended to provide a set of recommendations and best practices regarding uncertainty information. It is our hope that we can consider and examine additional areas of opportunity with regard to the cross-domain and cross-disciplinary aspects of Earth science data. For instance, the existing white paper covers uncertainty information from the perspective of satellite-based remote sensing well, but does not adequately address the in situ or airborne (i.e., sub-orbital) perspective. This session intends to explore such opportunities to expand the scope of the IQC’s awareness of what is being done with regard to uncertainty information, while also providing participants and observers with an opportunity to weigh in on how best to move forward with the follow-on paper. How to Prepare for this Session:Agenda:
  1. "IQC Uncertainty White Paper Status Summary and Next Steps" - Presented by: David Moroni (15 minutes)
  2. "Uncertainty quantification for in situ ocean data: The S-MODE sub-orbital campaign" - Presented by: Fred Bingham (15 minutes)
  3. "Uncertainty Quantification for Spatio-Temporal Mapping of Argo Float Data" - Presented by Mikael Kuusela (20 minutes)
  4. Panel Discussion (35 minutes)
  5. Closing Comments (5 minutes)
Notes Page: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1vfYBK_DLTAt535kMZusTPVCBAjDqptvT0AA5D6oWrEc/edit?usp=sharing

Presentations:
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11553681.v1

View Recording: https://youtu.be/vC2O8FRgvck

Takeaways

Speakers
avatar for David Moroni

David Moroni

Data Stewardship and User Services Team Lead, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center
I am a Senior Science Data Systems Engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Data Stewardship and User Services Team Lead for the PO.DAAC Project, which provides users with data stewardship services including discovery, access, sub-setting, visualization, extraction, documentation... Read More →
avatar for Ge Peng

Ge Peng

Research Scholar, CISESS/NCEI
Dataset-centric scientific data stewardship, data quality management
FB

Fred Bingham

University of North Carolina at Wilmington
MK

Mikael Kuusela

Carnegie Mellon University


Tuesday January 7, 2020 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Forest Glen
 
Wednesday, January 8
 

2:00pm EST

AI for Augmenting Geospatial Information Discovery
Thanks to the rapid developments of hardware and computer science, we have seen a lot of exciting breakthroughs in self driving, voice recognition, street view recognition, cancer detection, check deposit, etc. Sooner or later the fire of AI will burn in Earth science field. Scientists need high-level automation to discover in-time accurate geospatial information from big amount of Earth observations, but few of the existing algorithms can ideally solve the sophisticated problems within automation. However, nowadays the transition from manual to automatic is actually undergoing gradually, a bit by a bit. Many early-bird researchers have started to transplant the AI theory and algorithms from computer science to GIScience, and a number of promising results have been achieved. In this session, we will invite speakers to talk about their experiences of using AI in geospatial information (GI) discovery. We will discuss all aspects of "AI for GI" such as the algorithms, technical frameworks, used tools & libraries, and model evaluation in various individual use case scenarios. How to Prepare for this Session: https://esip.figshare.com/articles/Geoweaver_for_Better_Deep_Learning_A_Review_of_Cyberinfrastructure/9037091
https://esip.figshare.com/articles/Some_Basics_of_Deep_Learning_in_Agriculture/7631615

Presentations:
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11626299.v1

View Recording: https://youtu.be/W0q8WiMw9Hs

Takeaways
  • There is a significant uptake of machine learning/artificial intelligence for earth science applications in the recent decade;
  • The challenge of machine learning applications for earth science domain includes:
    • the quality and availability of training data sets;
    • Requires a team with diverse skill background to implement the application
    • Need better understanding of the underlying mechanism of ML/AI models
  • There are many promising applications/ developments on streamlining the process and application of machine learning applications for different sectors of the society (weather monitoring, emergency responses, social good)



Speakers
avatar for Yuhan (Douglas) Rao

Yuhan (Douglas) Rao

Postdoctoral Research Scholar, CISESS/NCICS/NCSU
avatar for Aimee Barciauskas

Aimee Barciauskas

Data engineer, Development Seed
avatar for Annie Burgess

Annie Burgess

ESIP Lab Director, ESIP
avatar for Rahul Ramachandran

Rahul Ramachandran

Project Manager, Sr. Research Scientist, NASA
avatar for Ziheng Sun

Ziheng Sun

Research Assistant Professor, George Mason University
My research interests are mainly on geospatial cyberinfrastructure and agricultural remote sensing.


Wednesday January 8, 2020 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Salon A-C
  Salon A-C, Breakout
 
Thursday, January 9
 

10:15am EST

Mapping Data & Operational Readiness Levels (ORLs) to Community Lifelines
Approach: The Disaster Lifecycle Cluster has seen great success in its efforts to put Federated arms around “trusted data for decision makers” as a way to accelerate situational awareness and decision-making. By identifying trust levels for data. This session will build upon the Summer meeting and align perfectly with the overall ESIP theme of: Data to Action: Increasing the Use and Value of Earth Science Data and Information.

The ESIP Disaster Lifecycle Cluster has evolved into one of the most operationally active clusters in the Federation with a thirst for applying datasets to decision-making environments while building trust levels that manifest themselves as ORLs. Duke Energy, All Hazards Consortium’s Sensitive Information Sharing environment (SISE), DHS and FEMA are all increasing their interest in ORLs with their sights set on implementing them in the near future. Data is available everywhere and more of it is on the way. Trusted data is available some places and can help decision makers such as utilities make 30-second decisions that can save lives, property and get the lights back on sooner, saving millions of dollars.

This session will provide the venue to discuss emerging projects from NASA’s Applied Sciences Division (A.37), Initiatives at JPL and Federal Agency data portal access that can accelerate decision making today and in the future. We will also discuss drone data and European satellite data that is available for access and use when disasters threaten. Come and join us, the data you have may just save a life.

Agenda:
  1. Greg McShane, DHS CISA - The Critical Nature of the Public-Private Trusted Information Sharing Paradigm (10 min) Presented by Tom Moran, All Hazards Consortium Executive Director
  2. Dave Jones, StormCenter/GeoCollaborate - The status of ORLs, where we are, ESIP Announcement at GEO in Australia, AHC SISE, Next Steps (10 min)
  3. Maggi Glassco, NASA Disasters Program, JPL - New Applied Sciences Disasters Projects, Possible Lifeline Support Information Sources in the Future (10 min)
  4. Bob Chen/Bob Downs, Columbia Univ./SEDAC/CIESIN - Specific Global and Local Population Data for Community Lifeline Decision Making (10 min)
  5. Discussion/Q&A Period (40 min)

Presentations

View Recording: https://youtu.be/gJ93R6SlMkM

Key Takeaways for this Session: 
  1. Through the All Hazards Consortium, a new research institute will begin to help bring candidate research products into operations. An imagery committee, consisting of private and research members under SISE, will identify and evaluate use-case driven candidate imagery data within the ORL context using Geo-Collaborate.
  2. NASA grant opportunities within the disasters program requires co-funding by end user partners to guide usage needs and adoption (using ARL success criteria). This should increase adoption of NASA funded ASP project data and/or services. The cluster would like to work with NASA ASP as a testbed for funded projects to connect to additional user communities.
  3. We discussed the need / value of population data (current and predictions on affected populations) for preparedness activities and emergency response. We would like to leverage additional data services from SEDAC to test with operational decision makers. 


Speakers
avatar for Dave Jones

Dave Jones

StormCenter Communications, StormCenter Communications
Real-time data access, sharing and collaboration across multiple platforms. Collaborative Common Operating Pictures, Decision Making, Situational Awareness, connecting disparate mapping systems to share data, cross-product data sharing and collaboration. SBIR Phase III status with... Read More →
avatar for Karen Moe

Karen Moe

NASA Goddard Emeritus
ESIP Disasters Lifecycle cluster co-chair with Dave Jones/StormCenter IncManaging an air quality monitoring project for my town just outside of Washington DC and looking for free software!! Enjoying citizen science roles in environmental monitoring and sustainable practices in my... Read More →


Thursday January 9, 2020 10:15am - 11:45am EST
Salon A-C
  Salon A-C, Breakout

12:00pm EST

Fire effects on soil morphology across time scales: Data needs for near- and long-term land and hazard management
Fire impacts soil hydrology and biogeochemistry at both near (hours to days) and long (decades to centuries) time scales. Burns, especially in soils with high organic carbon stocks like peatlands, induce a loss of absolute soil carbon stock. Additionally, fire can alter the chemical makeup of the organic matter, potentially making it more resistant to decomposition. On the shorter timescales, fire can also change the water repellent properties or hydrophobicity of the soil, leading to an increased risk of debris flows and floods.

In this session, we will focus on the varying data needs for assessing the effects of burns across time scales, from informing emergency response managers in the immediate post-burn days, to monitoring post-burn recovery, to managing carbon in a landscape decades out.

Speaker abstracts (in order of presentation):

James MacKinnon (NASA GSFC)
Machine learning methods for detecting wildfires 

This talk shows the innovative use of deep neural networks, a type of machine learning, to detect wildfires in MODIS multispectral data. This effort attained a very high classification accuracy showing that neural networks could be useful in a scientific context, especially when dealing with sparse events such as fire anomalies. Furthermore, we laid the groundwork to continue beyond binary fire classification towards being able to detect the "state," or intensity of the fire, eventually allowing for more accurate fire modeling. With this knowledge, we developed software to enable neural networks to run on even the typically compute-limited spaceflight-rated computers, and tested it by building a drone payload equipped with a flight computer analog and flew it over controlled burns to prove its efficacy.

Kathe Todd-Brown (U. FL Gainesville)
An overview of effects of fire on ecosystems

Fire is a defining characteristic of many ecosystems worldwide, and, as the climate warms, both fire frequency and severity are expected to increase. In addition to the effects of smoke on the climate and human health, there are less apparent effects of fire on the terrestrial ecosystem. From alterations in the local soil properties to changes in the carbon budget as organic carbon is combusted into CO2 and pyrogenic carbon, fire is deeply impactful to the local landscape. The long-term climate implication of fire on the terrestrial carbon budget is a tension between carbon lost to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide and sequestered in the soil as recalcitrant pyrogenic carbon. Here we present a new model to simulate the interaction between ecosystem growth, decomposition, and fire on carbon dynamics. We find that the carbon lost to burned carbon dioxide will always be recovered, if there is any recalcitrant pyrogenic carbon generated by the fires. The time scale of this recovery, however, is highly variable and often not relevant to land managers. This model highlights key data gaps at the annual and decadal time scales. Quantifying and predicting the loss of soil, litter, and vegetation carbon in an individual fire event is a key unknown. Relatedly, the amount of pyrogenic carbon generated by fire events is another near-term data needed to better constrain this model. Finally, on the longer time scales, the degree of recalcitrancy of pyrogenic carbon is a critical unknown.

Daniel Fuka (VA Tech)

Rapidly improving the spatial representation of soil properties using topographically derived initialization with a proposed workflow for new data integration
Topography exerts critical controls on many hydrologic, geomorphologic, biophysical, and forest fire processes. However, in modeling these systems, the current use of topographic data neglects opportunities to account for topographic controls on processes such as soil genesis, soil moisture distributions, and hydrological response; all factors that significantly characterize the post-fire effects and potential risks of the new landscape. In this presentation, we demonstrate a workflow that takes advantage of data brokering to combine the most recent topographic data and best available soil maps to increase the resolution and representational accuracy of spatial soil morphologic and hydrologic attributes: texture, depth, saturated conductivity, bulk density, porosity, and the water capacities at field and wilting point tensions. We show several proofs of concept and initial performance test the values of the topographically adjusted soil parameters against those from the NRCS SSURGO (Soil Survey Geographic database). Finally, we pose the potential for a quickly configurable opensource data brokering system (NSF BALTO) to be used to make available the most recently updated topographic and soils characteristics, so this workflow can rapidly re-characterize and increase the resolution of post-fire landscapes.

Dalia Kirschbaum (NASA GSFC)
Towards characterization of global post-fire debris flow hazard

Post-fire debris flows commonly occur in the western United States, but the extent of this hazard is little known in other regions. These events occur when rain falls on the ground with little vegetative cover and hydrophobic soils—two common side effects of wildfire. The storms that trigger post-fire debris flows are typically high-intensity, short-duration events. Thus, a first step towards global modeling of this hazard is to evaluate the ability of GPM IMERG and other global precipitation data to detect these storms. The second step is to determine the effectiveness of MCD64 and other globally available predictors in identifying locations susceptible to debris flows. Finally, rainfall and other variables can be combined into a single global model of post-fire debris flow occurrence. This research can show both where post-fire debris flows are currently most probable, as well as where the historical impact has been greatest.

How to Prepare for this Session:

Presentations

View Recording: https://youtu.be/I89om-kBYB0

Takeaways
  • Modeling and detecting fires and fire impacts is changing (e.g. neural networks, carbon modeling) and needs to continue to improve
  • There are many data needs to be able to operationalize post-fire debris flow and soil modeling
  • Fires severely change ecosystems and soils and we do not really understand the exact changes yet, need more research in this area


Speakers
KT

Kathe Todd-Brown

University of Florida Gainesville
DF

Dan Fuka

Virginia Tech
avatar for Bill Teng

Bill Teng

NASA GES DISC (ADNET)


Thursday January 9, 2020 12:00pm - 1:30pm EST
Salon A-C
  Salon A-C, Breakout