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Tuesday, January 7
 

2:00pm EST

Current Data that are available on the Cloud
NASA, NOAA and USGS are in the process of moving data onto the cloud. While they have discussed what types of services are available and future plans of what data can be found, it is not completely clear what datasets users can currently access. This session will go over what datasets are currently up in the cloud and what data to expect in the near future. This way as users are transitioning to the cloud for their compute, they can also know what data are available to them on the cloud as well. There will also be presentations from AWS. Speakers:
Katie Baynes - NASA/EOSDIS
Jon O'Neil - NOAA
Jeff de La Beaujardiere - NCAR
Kristi Kliene - USGS/EROS
Joe Flasher - AWS

Presentations: See attached.

View Recording: https://youtu.be/yssgXB7iaxw

Takeaways
  • Petabyte scale data is being moved into the cloud. This is concentrated in AWS, Google Cloud and Microsoft depending on the agency and dataset
  • Some concern around partnerships with companies (AWS most discussed) in terms of long term relationships, moving data etc. and how those things might impact access or data use
  • Need to make clear the authoritative source of the data, who is stewarding it, and any modifications done when copying to cloud. Users should exercise due diligence in selecting and using data.



Speakers
JO

Jon O'Neil

Director, NOAA Big Data Program, NOAA
avatar for Joe Flasher

Joe Flasher

Open Geospatial Data Lead, Amazon Web Services
Joe Flasher is the Open Geospatial Data Lead at Amazon Web Services helping organizations most effectively make data available for analysis in the cloud. The AWS open data program has democratized access to petabytes of data, including satellite imagery, genomic data, and data used... Read More →
avatar for Christopher Lynnes

Christopher Lynnes

Systems Architect, NASA/EOSDIS, NASA/GSFC
Christopher Lynnes is currently System Architect for NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System, known as EOSDIS. He has been working on EOSDIS since 1992, over which time he has worked multiple generations of data archive systems, search engines and interfaces, science... Read More →
avatar for Jessica Hausman

Jessica Hausman

Data Engineer, PO.DAAC JPL
avatar for Jeff de La Beaujardière

Jeff de La Beaujardière

Director, Information Systems Division, NCAR
Big data, cloud computing, object storage, data management.
avatar for Dave Meyer

Dave Meyer

GES DISC manager, NASA


Tuesday January 7, 2020 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
White Flint
  White Flint, Breakout

4:00pm EST

Bringing Science Data Uncertainty Down to Earth - Sub-orbital, In Situ, and Beyond
In the Fall of 2019, the Information Quality Cluster (IQC) published a white paper entitled “Understanding the Various Perspectives of Earth Science Observational Data Uncertainty”. The intention of this paper is to provide a diversely sampled exposition of both prolific and unique policies and practices, applicable in an international context of diverse policies and working groups, made toward quantifying, characterizing, communicating and making use of uncertainty information throughout the diverse, cross-disciplinary Earth science data landscape; to these ends, the IQC addressed uncertainty information from the following four perspectives: Mathematical, Programmatic, User, and Observational. These perspectives affect policies and practices in a diverse international context, which in turn influence how uncertainty is quantified, characterized, communicated and utilized. The IQC is now in a scoping exercise to produce a follow-on paper that is intended to provide a set of recommendations and best practices regarding uncertainty information. It is our hope that we can consider and examine additional areas of opportunity with regard to the cross-domain and cross-disciplinary aspects of Earth science data. For instance, the existing white paper covers uncertainty information from the perspective of satellite-based remote sensing well, but does not adequately address the in situ or airborne (i.e., sub-orbital) perspective. This session intends to explore such opportunities to expand the scope of the IQC’s awareness of what is being done with regard to uncertainty information, while also providing participants and observers with an opportunity to weigh in on how best to move forward with the follow-on paper. How to Prepare for this Session:Agenda:
  1. "IQC Uncertainty White Paper Status Summary and Next Steps" - Presented by: David Moroni (15 minutes)
  2. "Uncertainty quantification for in situ ocean data: The S-MODE sub-orbital campaign" - Presented by: Fred Bingham (15 minutes)
  3. "Uncertainty Quantification for Spatio-Temporal Mapping of Argo Float Data" - Presented by Mikael Kuusela (20 minutes)
  4. Panel Discussion (35 minutes)
  5. Closing Comments (5 minutes)
Notes Page: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1vfYBK_DLTAt535kMZusTPVCBAjDqptvT0AA5D6oWrEc/edit?usp=sharing

Presentations:
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11553681.v1

View Recording: https://youtu.be/vC2O8FRgvck

Takeaways

Speakers
avatar for David Moroni

David Moroni

Data Stewardship and User Services Team Lead, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center
I am a Senior Science Data Systems Engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Data Stewardship and User Services Team Lead for the PO.DAAC Project, which provides users with data stewardship services including discovery, access, sub-setting, visualization, extraction, documentation... Read More →
avatar for Ge Peng

Ge Peng

Research Scholar, CISESS/NCEI
Dataset-centric scientific data stewardship, data quality management
FB

Fred Bingham

University of North Carolina at Wilmington
MK

Mikael Kuusela

Carnegie Mellon University


Tuesday January 7, 2020 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Forest Glen

4:00pm EST

Defining the Bull's Eye of Sample Metadata
In recent years, the integration of physical collections and samples into digital data infrastructure has received increased attention in the context of Open Science and FAIR research results. In order to support open, transparent, and reproducible science, physical samples need to be uniquely identified, findable in online catalogues, well documented, and linked to related data, publications, people, and other relevant digital information. Substantial progress has been made through wide-spread implementation of the IGSN as a persistent unique identifier. What is missing is the development and implementation of protocols and best practices for sample metadata. Effort to do this have shown that it is impossible to develop a common vocabulary that describes all samples collected: one size does not fit all and each domain e.g. soil scientists, volcanologists, cosmochemists, paleoclimate scientists, and granite researchers – to name a few examples - all have their own vocabularies. Yet there is a minimum set of attributes that are common to all samples, the ‘Bull’s Eye of sample metadata’. This session invites participants from all walks of earth and environmental science to help define what is the minimum set of attributes needed to describe physical samples that are at the heart of much of Earth and environmental research.

How to Prepare for this Session:
Participations should come with a list of the mimimum metadata requirements for their institutions or domains.  They should be prepared to give a brief introduction to their needs.

Session Agenda:
  1. Introduction to the issue
  2. Review of existing examples and discussion of the limitations
  3. Discuss minimal requirements; propose changes/addition
  4. Summarize outcomes and discuss next steps
Google doc with the current metadata list and proposed changes

Presentations: ​​​​

View Recording: https://youtu.be/bxhTmrNqkCA

Takeaways

Speakers
avatar for Lesley Wyborn

Lesley Wyborn

Adjunct Fellow, Australian National University
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

President, IGSN e.V.
Kerstin Lehnert is Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of EarthChem, the System for Earth Sample Registration, and the Astromaterials Data System. Kerstin holds a Ph.D in Petrology from the University of Freiburg in... Read More →


Tuesday January 7, 2020 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Linden Oak
  Linden Oak, Working Session
 
Wednesday, January 8
 

2:00pm EST

FAIR Laboratory Instrumentation, Analytical Procedures, and Data Quality
Acquisition and analysis of data in the laboratory are pervasive in the Earth, environmental, and planetary sciences. Analytical and experimental laboratory data, often acquired with sophisticated and expensive instrumentation, are fundamental for understanding past, present, and future processes in natural systems, from the interior of the Earth to its surface environments on land, in the oceans, and in the air, to the entire solar system. Despite the importance of provenance information for analytical data including, for example, sample preparation or experimental set up, instrument type and configuration, calibration, data reduction, and analytical uncertainties, there are no consistent community-endorsed best practices and protocols for describing, identifying, and citing laboratory instrumentation and analytical procedures, and documenting data quality. This session is intended as a kick-off working session to engage researchers, data managers, and system engineers, to contribute ideas how to move forward with and accelerate the development of global standard protocols and the promulgation of best practices for analytical laboratory data. How to Prepare for this Session:

Presentations:

View Recording:
https://youtu.be/LOfb_4r7DBA

Takeaways
  • Analytical and experimental data are collected widely in both the field and laboratory settings from a variety of earth environmental and planetary sciences, spanning a variety of disciplines. FAIR use of such data is dependent of data provenance. 
  • Need community exchange of such data consider use of data is broader than the original use of data in the domain. Brings to mind interoperability of such data. Need networks of these data to be plugged into evolving CI systems. In seismology a common standard for data implemented by early visionaries was a massive boon to the field. 
  • Documentation of how analytical data were generated is time consuming for data curators providers etc. Having standards/protocols for data exchange protocols is urgently required for emerging global data networks. OneGeochemistry as example use case for international research group to establish a global network for discoverable geochemical data.


Speakers
avatar for Lesley Wyborn

Lesley Wyborn

Adjunct Fellow, Australian National University
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

President, IGSN e.V.
Kerstin Lehnert is Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of EarthChem, the System for Earth Sample Registration, and the Astromaterials Data System. Kerstin holds a Ph.D in Petrology from the University of Freiburg in... Read More →


Wednesday January 8, 2020 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Forest Glen
  Forest Glen, Working Session