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Tuesday, January 7
 

2:00pm EST

ESIP Geoscience Community Ontology Engineering Workshop (GCOEW)
"Brains! Brains! Give us your brains!""
- Friendly neighbourhood machine minds
The collective knowledge in the ESIP community is immense and invaluable. During this session, we'd like to make sure that this knowledge drives the semantic technology (ontologies) being developed to move data with machine-readable knowledge in Earth and planetary science.
What we'll do:

In the first half hour of this session, we'll a) sketch out how and why we build ontologies and b) show you how to request that your knowledge gets added to ontologies (with nanocrediting).
We'll then have a 30-minute crowdsourcing jam session, during which participants can share their geoscience knowledge on the SWEET issue tracker. With a simple post, you can shape how the semantic layer will behave, making sure it does your field justice! Request content and share knowledge here: https://github.com/ESIPFed/sweet/issues
In the last, 30 minutes we'll take one request and demonstrate how we go about ""ontologising"" it in ENVO and how we link that to SWEET to create interoperable ontologies across the Earth and life sciences.

Come join us and help us shape the future of Geo-semantics!

Stuff you'll need:
A GitHub account available at https://github.com/
An ORCID (for nanocrediting your contributions) available at https://orcid.org How to Prepare for this Session:

Presentations:

View Recording:
https://youtu.be/tr0coi5ZQvM

Takeaways
  • Working toward a future (5-10 year goal) of making an open Earth & Space Science Foundry (from SWEET) similar to the OBO (Open Biological and Biomedical Ontology) Foundry. “Humans write queries”. Class definitions need to be machine-readable for interoperability, but must remain human-readable for authoring queries, ontology reuse, etc.
  • Please feel free to add phenomena of interest to the SWEET https://github.com/ESIPFed/sweet/issues/ or ENVO https://github.com/EnvironmentOntology/envo/issues/ issue trackers. 
  • At AGU they added a convention for changes to ontologies. Class level annotation convention. Can get now get textual defs from DBpedia for SWEET terms. See https://github.com/ESIPFed/sweet/wiki/SWEET-Class-Annotation-Convention


Speakers
avatar for Lewis McGibbney

Lewis McGibbney

Enterprise Search Technologist III, Jet Propulsion Laboratory


Tuesday January 7, 2020 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Glen Echo
  Glen Echo, Working Session

2:00pm EST

COPDESS: Facilitating a Fair Publishing Workflow Ecosystem
COPDESS, the Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth and Space Sciences (https://copdess.org/), was established in October 2014 as a platform for Earth and Space Science publishers and data repositories to jointly define, implement, and promote common policies and procedures for the publication and citation of data and other research results (e.g., samples, software, etc.) across Earth Science journals. In late 2018, COPDESS became a cluster of ESIP to give the initiative the needed sustainability to support a long-term FAIR publishing workflow ecosystem and be a springboard to pursue future enhancements of it.

In 2017, with funding from the Arnold Foundation, the ‘Enabling FAIR Data Project’ (https://copdess.org/enabling-fair-data-project/) moved mountains towards implementing the policies and standards that connect researchers, publishers, and data repositories in their desire to accelerate scientific discovery through open and FAIR data. Implementation of the new FAIR policies has advanced rapidly across Earth, Space, and Environmental journals, but supporting infrastructure, guidelines, and training for researchers, publishers, and data repositories has yet to catch up. The primary challenges are:
  • Repositories struggle to keep up with the demands of researchers, who want to be able to instantly deposit data and obtain a DOI, without considering the data quality/data ingest requirements and review procedures of individual repositories - producing a situation where data publication is inconsistent in quality and content.
  • Many publishers who have signed the Commitment Statement for FAIR Data (https://copdess.org/enabling-fair-data-project/commitment-statement-in-the-earth-space-and-environmental-sciences/) agree with it at a high, conceptual level. However, many journal editors and reviewers lack clarity on how to validate that datasets, which underpin scholarly publications, conform with the Commitment Statement.
  • Researchers experience confusion, and in some cases barriers to publication of their papers whilst they try and meet the requirements of the commitment statement. Clarity of requirements, timelines, and criteria for selecting repositories are needed to minimize the barriers to the joint publication of papers and associated data.

Funders have a role to play, in that they need to allow for time and resources required to curate data and ensure compliance, particularly WRT to the assignment of valid DOIs. Funders can also begin to reward those researchers who do take the effort to properly manage and make their data available, in a similar way to how they reward scholarly publications and citation of those publications.

The goal of this session is to start a conversation on developing an integrated publishing workflow ecosystem the seamlessly integrates researchers, repositories, publishers and funders. Perspectives from all viewpoints will be presented.

Notes document: https://docs.google.com/document/d/12M0F6mcUZSn2GdBN-Id__smXhYxbLzKDrAViPAgnH6w/edit?usp=sharing

Presentations:

View Recording: https://youtu.be/x6a1QRNbifQ

Takeaways
  • COPDESS has moved to ESIP as a cluster to ensure the sustainability of the project to address the publishing & citation of research data



Speakers
avatar for Karl Benedict

Karl Benedict

Director of Research Data Services & Information Technology, University of New Mexico
Since 1986 I have had parallel careers in Information Technology, Data Management and Analysis, and Archaeology. Since 1993 when I arrived at UNM I have worked as a Graduate Student in Anthropology, Research Scientist, Research Faculty, Applied Research Center Director, and currently... Read More →
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

President, IGSN e.V.
Kerstin Lehnert is Doherty Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance that operates EarthChem, the System for Earth Sample Registration, and the Astromaterials Data System. Kerstin... Read More →
avatar for Lesley Wyborn

Lesley Wyborn

Honorary Professor, Australian National University


Tuesday January 7, 2020 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Salon A-C
  Salon A-C, Breakout

2:00pm EST

Current Data that are available on the Cloud
NASA, NOAA and USGS are in the process of moving data onto the cloud. While they have discussed what types of services are available and future plans of what data can be found, it is not completely clear what datasets users can currently access. This session will go over what datasets are currently up in the cloud and what data to expect in the near future. This way as users are transitioning to the cloud for their compute, they can also know what data are available to them on the cloud as well. There will also be presentations from AWS. Speakers:
Katie Baynes - NASA/EOSDIS
Jon O'Neil - NOAA
Jeff de La Beaujardiere - NCAR
Kristi Kliene - USGS/EROS
Joe Flasher - AWS

Presentations: See attached.

View Recording: https://youtu.be/yssgXB7iaxw

Takeaways
  • Petabyte scale data is being moved into the cloud. This is concentrated in AWS, Google Cloud and Microsoft depending on the agency and dataset
  • Some concern around partnerships with companies (AWS most discussed) in terms of long term relationships, moving data etc. and how those things might impact access or data use
  • Need to make clear the authoritative source of the data, who is stewarding it, and any modifications done when copying to cloud. Users should exercise due diligence in selecting and using data.



Speakers
JO

Jonathan ONeil

Director, NOAA Big Data Program, NOAA
avatar for Joe Flasher

Joe Flasher

Open Geospatial Data Lead, Amazon Web Services
Joe Flasher is the Open Geospatial Data Lead at Amazon Web Services helping organizations most effectively make data available for analysis in the cloud. The AWS open data program has democratized access to petabytes of data, including satellite imagery, genomic data, and data used... Read More →
avatar for Christopher Lynnes

Christopher Lynnes

Systems Architect, NASA/EOSDIS, NASA
Christopher Lynnes is currently System Architect for NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System, known as EOSDIS. He has been working on EOSDIS since 1992, over which time he has worked multiple generations of data archive systems, search engines and interfaces, science... Read More →
avatar for Jessica Hausman

Jessica Hausman

NASA HQ / ASRC Federal
avatar for Jeff de La Beaujardiere

Jeff de La Beaujardiere

Director, Information Systems Division, NCAR
I am the Director of the NCAR/CISL Information Systems Division. My focus is on the entire spectrum of geospatial data usability: ensuring that Earth observations and model outputs are open, discoverable, accessible, documented, interoperable, citable, curated for long-term preservation... Read More →
avatar for Dave Meyer

Dave Meyer

GES DISC manager, NASA/Goddard


Tuesday January 7, 2020 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
White Flint
  White Flint, Breakout
 
Thursday, January 9
 

10:15am EST

Working Group for the Data Stewardship Committee
This session is a working group for the 2020-2021 year for the Data Stewardship committee. We will discuss priorities for the next year, potential collaborative outputs, and review the work in progress from the last year. 

Notes Document: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1B_0K5jGnFgH72U3P2-oGr5vEqHOGU8CWU-IkZ6pjXbM/edit?ts=5e174588

Presentations

View Recording: https://youtu.be/am-ZLfHgM4w

Takeaways
  • Wow, the members of the Committee really are active! Practically everyone has their own cluster or two!
  • Six activities proposed for the upcoming year have champions who will lead the effort to define the outputs of their selected activity.


Speakers
avatar for Alexis Garretson

Alexis Garretson

Community Fellow, ESIP
avatar for Kelsey Breseman

Kelsey Breseman

Archiving Program Lead, Environmental Data & Governance Initiative
Governmental accountability around public data & the environment. Decentralized web. Intersection of tech & ethics & civics.


Thursday January 9, 2020 10:15am - 11:45am EST
Forest Glen
  Forest Glen, Business Meeting

10:15am EST

Connecting Data with Data Usage: a Graph Approach
We will investigate graph-based methods of connecting data with the uses made and the knowledge gained from those data, from science research to applications to strategic planning. We will examine the diverse capabilities enabled by connecting uses with data for a variety of stakeholders, and explore how to connect existing knowledge graphs together to scale out across the ESIP federation and related communities toward an inter-connected mega-graph.

0-5 min: Chris Lynnes (NASA): Documenting how data matters...
5-15 min: Doug Newman (NASA): EOSDIS Knowledge Graph
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11561805.v1
15-25 min: Reid Sherman (GCIS): Global Change Information System
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11560011.v1
25-35 min: Dave Blodgett (USGS): SELFIE
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11559093.v1
35-45 min: Joe Conran (NOAA): Interagency Coordination of Satellite Needs
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11561946.v1
45-55 min: Wil Doane (IDA): Assessing the Impact of Land Imaging
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11561913.v1
55-90 min: The Way Forward:
1 - Got Use Case?
2 - ESIP Cluster? https://www.esipfed.org/get-involved/collaborate
3 - Who's In?

Session Notes

View Recording:
https://youtu.be/yi05crW6Ya0\

Takeaways
  • How to connect data with the uses of that data = Documenting how data matter.
    Federating knowledge bases is daunting task but possible.
  • Connect research and data to place (but gap around using place identifiers in linked data).
    Discussion of potentially make a new cluster or using another one. Decision to recharter/repurpose/rename the data discovery cluster.
  • Sin of computer science is giving people impression that things are mostly 1 to 1 relationship, but more accurately life and universe is full of many-to-many relationships, i.e., graph databases > RDBMS




Speakers
avatar for Christopher Lynnes

Christopher Lynnes

Systems Architect, NASA/EOSDIS, NASA
Christopher Lynnes is currently System Architect for NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System, known as EOSDIS. He has been working on EOSDIS since 1992, over which time he has worked multiple generations of data archive systems, search engines and interfaces, science... Read More →
avatar for Doug Newman

Doug Newman

EED Data Use Architect


Thursday January 9, 2020 10:15am - 11:45am EST
White Flint
  White Flint, Panel

12:00pm EST

Research Object Citation Cluster Working Session
ESIP has published guidelines for citing data and for citing software and services. These have been important and influential ESIP products. Now a new cluster is working to address the issues of “research object” citation writ large. The cluster has been working to identify the various types of research objects that could or should be cited such as samples, instruments, annotations, and other artifacts. We have also been examining the various concerns that may be addressed in citing the objects such as access, credit or attribution, and scientific reproducibility. We find that citation of different types of objects may need to address different concerns and that different approaches may be necessary for different concerns and objects. We have, therefore, been working through a matrix that attempts to map all the various objects and citation concerns.

In this working session, we will provide a brief overview of the cluster's work to date on determining when different research objects get IDs. We will then work in small groups to determine when different research objects need to be identified to ensure reproducibility or validity of a result. For this purpose, we define reproducibility as the ability to independently recreate or confirm a result (not the data). A result could be a finding in a scientific paper, a legal brief, a policy recommendation, a model output or derived product — essentially any formal, testable assertion. This is essentially a provenance use case. It is very broad, but distinct from the credit and even the access concerns of citation. This is primarily about unambiguous reference. When does an object become a first-class research object?
To approach the problem, we will break up into 4-5 groups to define and give examples of different clusters of research objects and then work to answer When or under what circumstance is it necessary to identify an object to enable reproducibility. 
Potential groups include:
  1. Literature and related objects (not to be discussed)
  2. Software and related objects — Dan Katz
  3. Data and related objects — Mark Parsons
  4. Samples — Sarah Ramdeen
  5. Ontologies and vocabularies — Ruth Duerr
  6. Complex research objects (esp. but not exclusively learning resources) — Nancy Hoebelheinrich
  7. Instruments and facilites — Mike Daniels
  8. Organizations 
  9. Activities
We encourage everyone  to start drafting definitions and examples in the spreadsheet now: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1VEYPLgTsCR_zbMUbThonBrqaYqBiMT4e525NzFi7ql8/edit#gid=1494916301
Our goal is to have a draft recommendation or complete matrix by the end of the meeting as well as potential follow-on activities for the cluster.

How to Prepare for this Session: Participants should be familiar with existing ESIP citation guidelines and have reviewed the minutes of the last several meetings, especially the "Objects and Concerns Matrix". See http://wiki.esipfed.org/index.php/Research_Object_Citation

Presentations

View Recording:
https://youtu.be/5MXzBLu7hjg (abbreviated due to breakout group emphasis of session).

Takeaways
  • What is a ‘thing’? ‘Research object’ is a defined term in other communities. Our conception is broader. Perhaps we need a new term, but much of the issue is defining when something becomes a ‘thing’ that is named and located.
  • The particular citation use case matters a lot. Reproducibility demands different considerations than credit. The cluster will consider more use cases.
  • There appears to be classes of things that can be treated similarly, but we haven’t sorted that out yet.



Speakers
avatar for Jessica Hausman

Jessica Hausman

NASA HQ / ASRC Federal
avatar for Mark Parsons

Mark Parsons

Editor in Chief, Data Science Journal


Thursday January 9, 2020 12:00pm - 1:30pm EST
Linden Oak
  Linden Oak, Working Session