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Deep Dive [clear filter]
Tuesday, January 7
 

11:00am EST

Public-Private Partnerships for Earth Observations
The USGS Earth Observation Community is interested in investigating public-private partnerships including "how might these partnerships work;" "how would the data be used;" and “what are the potential benefits of the partnerships.”  For example, a motivating question is: "would a public-private partnership allow a sufficient business case for Landsat and what would that look like?". This question is supported by the recent Landsat Advisory Group (LAG) report (https://www.fgdc.gov/ngac/meetings/june-2019/ngac-paper-evaluation-of-a-range-of-landsat-data.pdf) that indicated "LAG recommends further research on the viability of a PPP model for Landsat. Such research should include dialogue with industry as early as possible to make sure its concerns are considered".

This breakout session will build on the discussion started in the plenary session earlier this morning in which the diverse experiences of public- and private-sector participants in public-private partnerships were highlighted. At the beginning of the session, attendees will be asked to select 3-4 questions like those posed above to be the topic of tabletop discussions in which the following questions will be posed:


  • Who are the interested or potential partners in a partnership related to the topic?
  • What are the potential mechanisms for establishing the partnership?
  • What are the added-value benefits of the partnership vs. the status quo of the participants working on their own? I.e. what are the needs of the private- and public-sector participants in a potential partnership?
  • How can the ESIP community facilitate the identification and development of new public-private partnerships that will increase the value and impact of EO data?
We will then finish the breakout session with a 20-minute report-out and discussion of the outcomes of the discussions in the individual groups.
How to Prepare for this Session:

Come to the session prepared to discuss potential partnership ideas, your experience in building and supporting partnerships, and a willingness to see where new collaborations can take us.

We hope to bring out of this session a summary document that summarizes the insights and steps forward that come out of the tabletop discussions, including action items related to following on emerging partnerships and identifying concrete actions that ESIP can take to support community participation in developing partnerships.

Takeaways
  • ESIP can continue as a place to convene and build public and private partnership types. Include collaboration areas, guidance on concerns, or common structure.
  • Do we want to form a cluster to continue this? The private sector says yes. If interested, look at www.surveymonkey.com/r/P3_collab. ESIP housing knowledge tools as to the efficacy of different partnerships and stories from the community.
  • Public and private is n to expand the use of data at different levels, to provide it for both private and public groups.




Speakers
avatar for Karl Benedict

Karl Benedict

Director of Research Data Services & Information Technology, University of New Mexico
Since 1986 I have had parallel careers in Information Technology, Data Management and Analysis, and Archaeology. Since 1993 when I arrived at UNM I have worked as a Graduate Student in Anthropology, Research Scientist, Research Faculty, Applied Research Center Director, and currently... Read More →
avatar for Crista Straub

Crista Straub

Social Scientist, U.S. Geological Survey
Dr. Straub is a social scientist in the National Land Imaging Program and the Social and Economic Analysis Branch at the United States Geological Survey. Crista earned a PhD in interdisciplinary human dimensions of natural resources from the University of Maine’s Ecology & Environmental... Read More →


Tuesday January 7, 2020 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
Salon A-C
  Salon A-C, Panel

2:00pm EST

ESIP Geoscience Community Ontology Engineering Workshop (GCOEW)
"Brains! Brains! Give us your brains!""
- Friendly neighbourhood machine minds
The collective knowledge in the ESIP community is immense and invaluable. During this session, we'd like to make sure that this knowledge drives the semantic technology (ontologies) being developed to move data with machine-readable knowledge in Earth and planetary science.
What we'll do:

In the first half hour of this session, we'll a) sketch out how and why we build ontologies and b) show you how to request that your knowledge gets added to ontologies (with nanocrediting).
We'll then have a 30-minute crowdsourcing jam session, during which participants can share their geoscience knowledge on the SWEET issue tracker. With a simple post, you can shape how the semantic layer will behave, making sure it does your field justice! Request content and share knowledge here: https://github.com/ESIPFed/sweet/issues
In the last, 30 minutes we'll take one request and demonstrate how we go about ""ontologising"" it in ENVO and how we link that to SWEET to create interoperable ontologies across the Earth and life sciences.

Come join us and help us shape the future of Geo-semantics!

Stuff you'll need:
A GitHub account available at https://github.com/
An ORCID (for nanocrediting your contributions) available at https://orcid.org How to Prepare for this Session:

Presentations:

View Recording:
https://youtu.be/tr0coi5ZQvM

Takeaways
  • Working toward a future (5-10 year goal) of making an open Earth & Space Science Foundry (from SWEET) similar to the OBO (Open Biological and Biomedical Ontology) Foundry. “Humans write queries”. Class definitions need to be machine-readable for interoperability, but must remain human-readable for authoring queries, ontology reuse, etc.
  • Please feel free to add phenomena of interest to the SWEET https://github.com/ESIPFed/sweet/issues/ or ENVO https://github.com/EnvironmentOntology/envo/issues/ issue trackers. 
  • At AGU they added a convention for changes to ontologies. Class level annotation convention. Can get now get textual defs from DBpedia for SWEET terms. See https://github.com/ESIPFed/sweet/wiki/SWEET-Class-Annotation-Convention


Speakers
avatar for Lewis J. McGibbney

Lewis J. McGibbney

Chair, ESIP Semantic Technologies Committee, NASA, JPL
My name is Lewis John McGibbney, I am currently a Data Scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California where I work in Computer Science and Data Intensive Applications. I enjoy floating up and down the tide of technologies @ The Apache Software Foundation having... Read More →


Tuesday January 7, 2020 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Glen Echo
  Glen Echo, Working Session

4:00pm EST

ESIP/OGC Coverage Processing and Analysis Sprint Report-Out
Learn what came out of two days of sprinting on how to advance APIs for analytics on coverages, arrays, and gridded data.

Join the conversation on the Gitter Channel or check out issues on Github.

Presentations:

View Recording:
https://youtu.be/blWnKTlrgKY

Takeaways
  • Overview of OGC API Sprint: What is distinction between Features and Coverages? Answer can be self-referential. Looking to gather feedback at https://github.com/opengeospatial/ogc_api_coverages
  • Future API will be view of data. It will support feature view or coverage view as layers, functional render of underlying data.
  • Idea is to provide single, holistic API that lets you daisy-chain any level of complexity by combining modular sub-APIs into workflow ‘processes’.


Speakers
avatar for Ingo Simonis

Ingo Simonis

Director Innovation Programs & Science, OGC
Dr. Ingo Simonis is director of interoperability programs and science at the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), an international consortium of more than 525 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly... Read More →
avatar for George Percivall

George Percivall

CTO, Chief Engineer, Open Geospatial Consortium
As CTO and Chief Engineer of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), George Percivall is responsible for the OGC Interoperability Program and the OGC Compliance Program. His roles include articulating OGC standards as a coherent architecture, as well as addressing implications of technology... Read More →


Tuesday January 7, 2020 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Glen Echo
  Glen Echo, Breakout

4:00pm EST

Defining the Bull's Eye of Sample Metadata
In recent years, the integration of physical collections and samples into digital data infrastructure has received increased attention in the context of Open Science and FAIR research results. In order to support open, transparent, and reproducible science, physical samples need to be uniquely identified, findable in online catalogues, well documented, and linked to related data, publications, people, and other relevant digital information. Substantial progress has been made through wide-spread implementation of the IGSN as a persistent unique identifier. What is missing is the development and implementation of protocols and best practices for sample metadata. Effort to do this have shown that it is impossible to develop a common vocabulary that describes all samples collected: one size does not fit all and each domain e.g. soil scientists, volcanologists, cosmochemists, paleoclimate scientists, and granite researchers – to name a few examples - all have their own vocabularies. Yet there is a minimum set of attributes that are common to all samples, the ‘Bull’s Eye of sample metadata’. This session invites participants from all walks of earth and environmental science to help define what is the minimum set of attributes needed to describe physical samples that are at the heart of much of Earth and environmental research.

How to Prepare for this Session:
Participations should come with a list of the mimimum metadata requirements for their institutions or domains.  They should be prepared to give a brief introduction to their needs.

Session Agenda:
  1. Introduction to the issue
  2. Review of existing examples and discussion of the limitations
  3. Discuss minimal requirements; propose changes/addition
  4. Summarize outcomes and discuss next steps
Google doc with the current metadata list and proposed changes

Presentations: ​​​​

View Recording: https://youtu.be/bxhTmrNqkCA

Takeaways

Speakers
avatar for Lesley Wyborn

Lesley Wyborn

Adjunct Fellow, Australian National University
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

President, IGSN e.V.
Kerstin Lehnert is Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of EarthChem, the System for Earth Sample Registration, and the Astromaterials Data System. Kerstin holds a Ph.D in Petrology from the University of Freiburg in... Read More →


Tuesday January 7, 2020 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Linden Oak
  Linden Oak, Working Session

4:00pm EST

Schema.org - Developing a Plan to Govern science-on-schema.org
This session will walkthrough the ESIP Github repository at https://github.com/ESIPFed/science-on-schema.org
Discussion:
* How do we govern as a cluster?
* Monitoring updates to schema.org?
* Strategies for proposing changes to core schema.org?
* Extensions at geoschemas.org

How to Prepare for this Session: Review the contents of https://github.com/ESIPFed/science-on-schema.org

Notes: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11542068.v1

View Recording: https://youtu.be/jPeuyOeIKzg

Takeaways
  • Governance issue for cluster: using Github issues to manage development is this suitable or do people need translation from github issues/json blobs into english for non-technical users.
  • TODO item potentially for COR: create and or use existing CC license ontology to reference urls to licenses properly and unambiguously.
  • Decision made to update the guidance documents to recommend appropriate ontology (e.g., CC licenses) and if nothing else exists use spec URL. License vocab https://spdx.org/licenses/ (text or URL)



Speakers
avatar for Adam Shepherd

Adam Shepherd

Technical Director, Co-PI, BCO-DMO
schema.org | Data Containerization | Linked Data | Semantic Web | Knowledge Representation | Ontologies


Tuesday January 7, 2020 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Salon A-C
  Salon A-C, Business Meeting
  • Skill Level Jump In, Deep Dive
  • Keywords Semantics
  • Collaboration Area Tags Schema.org
  • Remote Participation Link: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/195545333
  • Remote Participation Phone #: (571) 317-3129
  • Remote Participation Access Code 195-545-333
  • Additional Phone #'s: Australia: +61 2 8355 1050 Austria: +43 7 2081 5427 Belgium: +32 28 93 7018 Canada: +1 (647) 497-9391 Denmark: +45 32 72 03 82 Finland: +358 923 17 0568 France: +33 170 950 594 Germany: +49 692 5736 7317 Ireland: +353 15 360 728 Italy: +39 0 230 57 81 42 Netherlands: +31 207 941 377 New Zealand: +64 9 280 6302 Norway: +47 21 93 37 51 Spain: +34 912 71 8491 Sweden: +46 853 527 836 Switzerland: +41 225 4599 78 United Kingdom: +44 330 221 0088
 
Wednesday, January 8
 

11:00am EST

Accelerating convergence of earth and space data in teaching and learning through participatory design.
Bringing remote sensing and astronomical data to life for students is a challenge for earth and space science educators. This session will engage teachers and scientists in a participatory design process that will demonstrate the power of data science, identify challenges in teaching and learning, and seek pathways to develop next generation tools and curricula to close the gap between science practice and education. This workshop extends an NSF convergence accelerator for earth and space data and will also help inform an upcoming NSF-funded workshop titled: Data Science for High School Computer Science: Identifying Needs, Gaps and Resources.
We are proposing a working session, working directly with teachers on tool development using a participatory design kind of approach. The ESIP Education Committee is working to identify DC-area schools to work with over the long term, and this session could be a good first step in that relationship. For this workshop, a minimum of three DC-area teachers will work with ESIP Education Committee members and facilitators.

How to Prepare for this Session:

Presentations: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11591211.v1

View Recording: https://youtu.be/xSjLF_TbV30

Takeaways
  • There are many tools that already exist but they need to be more easily connected to the curriculum
  • There are constraints to which tools schools can use because they cannot have blogging features and present other security risks. Also, they have limited technological availability



Speakers
avatar for Shelley Olds

Shelley Olds

Science Education Specialist, UNAVCO
Data visualization tools, Earth science education, human dimensions of natural hazards, disaster risk reduction (DRR), resilience building.
avatar for Becky Reid

Becky Reid

Science Educator, Learners Without Walls
I discovered ESIP in the summer of 2009 when I was teaching science in Santa Barbara and attended the Summer meeting there. Ever since then, I have been volunteering with the ESIP Education Committee in various capacities, serving as Chair in 2013, 2019, and now, 2020! I currently... Read More →


Wednesday January 8, 2020 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
Brookside A
  Brookside A, Working Session

11:00am EST

Software Sustainability, Discovery and Accreditation
It is commonly understood that software is essential to research, in data collection, curation, analysis, and understanding, and it is also a critical element within any research infrastructure. This session will address two related software issues: 1) sustainability, and 2) discovery and accreditation.

Because scientific software is an instance of a software stack containing problem-specific software, discipline-specific tools, general tools and middleware, and infrastructural software, changes within the stack can cause the overall software to collapse and stop working, and as time goes on, work is increasingly needed to compensate for these problems, which we refer to as sustainability. Issues in which we are interested include incentives that encourage sustainability activities, business models for sustainability (including public-private partnership), software design that can reduce the sustainability burden, and metrics to measure sustainability (perhaps tied to the on-going process of defining FAIR software).

The second issue, discovery and accreditation, asks how we enable users to discover and access trustworthy and fit-for-purpose software to undertake science processing on the compute infrastructures to which they have access? And how do we ensure that publications cite the exact version of software that was used and is cited and properly credited the responsible authors?

This session will include a number of short talks, and at least two breakouts in parallel, one about the sustainability of software, and a second about discovery of sustainable and viable solutions.

Potential speakers who want to talk about an aspect of software sustainability, discovery, or accreditation should contact the session organizers.

Agenda/slides:
Presentations: See above

View Recording:
https://youtu.be/nsxjOC04JxQ

Key takeaways:

1. Funding agencies spend a large amount of money on software, but don't always know this because it's not something that they track.

OpenSource software is growing very quickly:
  • 2001: 208K SourceForge users
  • 2017: 20M GitHub users
  • 2019: 37M Github users
Software, like data, is a “first class citizen” in the ecosystem of tools and resources for scientific research and our community is accelerating their attention to this as they have for FAIR data


2. Ideas for changing our culture to better support and reward contributions to sustainable software:
  • Citation (ESIP guidelines) and/or software heritage IDs for credit and usage metrics and to meet publisher requirements (e.g. AGU)
  • Prizes
  • Incentives in hiring and promotion
  • Promote FAIR principles and/or Technical Readiness Levels for software
  • Increased use to make science more efficient through common software
  • Publish best practice materials in other languages, e.g. Mandarin, as software comes from a global community


3. A checklist of topics to consider for your community sustained software:
  • Repository with “cookie cutter” templates and sketches for forking
  • Licensing
  • Contributors Guide
  • Code of Conduct and Governance
  • Use of “Self-Documentation” features and standards
  • Easy step for trying out software
  • Continuous Integration builds
  • Unit tests
  • Good set of “known first issues” for new users trying out the software
  • Gitter or Slack Channel for feedback and communication, beyond a simple repo issues queue


Detailed notes:
The group then divided into 2 breakout sessions (Sustainability; Discovery and Accreditation), with notes as follows.

Notes from Sustainability breakout (by Daniel S. Katz):

What we think should be done:
  • Build a cookiecutter recipe for new projects, based on Ben’s slides?  What part of ESIP would be interested in this? And would do it, and support it?
  • Define governance as part of this? How do we store governance?
  • What is required, what is optional (maybe with different answers at different tiers)
  • Define types of projects (individual developer, community code, …)
  • Define for different languages – tooling needs to match needs
  • Is this specific to ESIP? Who could it be done with? The Carpentries?  SSI?

Other discussion:
  • What do we mean by sustainability – for how long?  Up to 50 years?  How do we run the system?
  • What’s the purpose of the software (use case) – transparency to see the software, actual reuse?
  • What about research objects that contain both software and data? How do we archive them? How do we cite them?
  • We have some overlap with research object citation cluster


Notes from Discovery and Accreditation breakout (by Shelley Stall):

Use Cases - Discovery
  1. science question- looking for software to support
  2. have some data output from a software process, need to gain access to the software to better understand the data.   

Example of work happening: Data and Software Preservation - NSF Funded
  • promote linked data to other research products
  • similar project in Australia - want to gain access to the chain of events that resulted in the data and/or software - the scientific drivers that resulted in this product
  • Provenance information is part of this concept.

A deeper look at discovery, once software is found, is to better understand how the software came into being. It is important to know the undocumented elements of a process that effected/impacted the chain of events that are useful information to understand for a particular piece of software.
How do we discover existing packages?
Dependency management helps to discover new elements that support software.
Concern expressed that packaged solution for creating an environment, like “AWS/AMI”, are not recognized as good enough, that an editor requested a d

Speakers
avatar for Daniel S. Katz

Daniel S. Katz

Assistant Dir. for Scientific Software & Applications, NCSA; Research Assoc. Prof., CS, ECE, iSchool, University of Illinois
avatar for Lesley Wyborn

Lesley Wyborn

Adjunct Fellow, Australian National University


Wednesday January 8, 2020 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
Forest Glen
  Forest Glen, Working Session

11:00am EST

Earth Observation Process and Application Discovery, Machine Learning, and Federated Cloud Analytics: Putting data to work using OGC Standards
This session provides an overview of the results from the recent OGC Research & Development initiative Testbed-15. The 9-months 5M USD initiative addressed six different topics, Earth Observation Process and Application Discovery, Machine Learning, Federated Cloud Analytics, Open Portrayal Framework, Delta Updates, and Data Centric Security. This session focuses on the results produced by the first three.

Earth Observation Process and Application Discovery developed draft specifications and models for discovery of cloud-provided process and applications. This was achieved by extending existing standards with process and application specific extensions. Now, data processing software can be made available as a service, discovered using catalog interfaces, and executed on demand by customers. This allows to locate the process execution physically close to the data and reduces data transport overheads.

The Machine Learning research developed models in the areas of earth observation data processing, image classification, feature extraction and segmentation, vector attribution, discovery and cataloguing, forest inventory management & optimization, and semantic web-link building and triple generation. Both model discovery and access took place through standardized interfaces.

The Federated Cloud Analytics research analysed how to handle data and processing capacities that are provided by individual cloud environments transparently to the user. The research included how federated membership, resource, and access policy management can be provided within a security environment, while also providing portability and interoperability to all stakeholders. Additionally, the initiative conducted a study of the application of Distributed Ledger Technologies (DLTs), and more specifically Blockchains, for managing provenance information in Federated Cloud.

The other three topics will be briefly introduced in addition. The Open Portrayal Framework provides a fully interoperable portrayal and styling suite of standards. Here, the initiative developed new OGC APIs for styles, maps, images, and tiles. Delta updates explored incremental updates and thus reduced communication payloads between clients and servers, whereas the Data Centric Security thread examined the use of encrypted container formats on standard metadata bindings. How to Prepare for this Session: Al results will be made available as public Engineering Reports that provide full details. These become stepwise available at http://docs.opengeospatial.org/per/

Presentations:
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11551563.v1

View Recording: https://youtu.be/ojMrcIE-SgE

Takeaways
  • OGC innovation program: Test fitness for purpose of geospatial community initiatives. TESTBED-15 concluded last November results available soon from document repository. End to end cloud pipeline for data processing and analytics. Call for TESTBED-16 due Feb 9th 2020! 1.6M in funding available. Three major threads: earth observation clouds, data integration and analytics, and modeling and packaging. 
  • Way to synergize between needs of user communities competing and collaborating projects, contributing to a more interoperable world. Provides applications, process and catalogues for data processing. 
  • Testbeds center around an exploitation/processing platform (for data with relevant applications) like an application market with cloud services. Having some trouble finding application developers. Finding web services with relevant data can be problematic.



Speakers
avatar for Ingo Simonis

Ingo Simonis

Director Innovation Programs & Science, OGC
Dr. Ingo Simonis is director of interoperability programs and science at the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), an international consortium of more than 525 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly... Read More →


Wednesday January 8, 2020 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
White Flint
  White Flint, Breakout

2:00pm EST

Participatory design and evaluation of a 3D-Printed Automatic Weather Station to explore hardware, software and data needs for community-driven decision making
The development of low-cost, 3D-printed weather stations aims to revolutionize the way communities collect long-term data about local weather phenomenon, as well as develop climate resilience strategies to adapt to the impacts of increasingly uncertain climate trends. This session will engage teachers and scientists in the evaluation and participatory design of the IoTwx 3D-printed weather station that is designed to be constructed and extended by students in middle and high school. We aim to explore the full spectrum of the station from construction (from pre-printed parts), to data collection and development of learning activities, to analysis of scientific phenomenon within the data. The stations also represent a unique opportunity to develop community-based strategies to extend the capabilities of the platform, and in the session we are encouraging full discussion of data collection and sensing technologies of specific relevance to communities adopting the stations.

In this working session, we will work directly with teachers on evaluation and development using a participatory design approach to stimulate and encourage relationships between ESIP Education Committee members and teachers.

Preparing for this Session: TBD

Presentations:

View Recording: https://youtu.be/AfvWhZBkQd8

Takeaways
  • Very valuable for the schools and community. It is an opportunity to include multiple departments within the school system (engineering, computer science, maths, earth science, etc.)
  • Need to understand the constraints that school systems may present: security, wifi, processing power, cloud access, only required for part of the year



Speakers
avatar for Shelley Olds

Shelley Olds

Science Education Specialist, UNAVCO
Data visualization tools, Earth science education, human dimensions of natural hazards, disaster risk reduction (DRR), resilience building.
avatar for Becky Reid

Becky Reid

Science Educator, Learners Without Walls
I discovered ESIP in the summer of 2009 when I was teaching science in Santa Barbara and attended the Summer meeting there. Ever since then, I have been volunteering with the ESIP Education Committee in various capacities, serving as Chair in 2013, 2019, and now, 2020! I currently... Read More →


Wednesday January 8, 2020 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Brookside A
  Brookside A, Working Session

2:00pm EST

AI for Augmenting Geospatial Information Discovery
Thanks to the rapid developments of hardware and computer science, we have seen a lot of exciting breakthroughs in self driving, voice recognition, street view recognition, cancer detection, check deposit, etc. Sooner or later the fire of AI will burn in Earth science field. Scientists need high-level automation to discover in-time accurate geospatial information from big amount of Earth observations, but few of the existing algorithms can ideally solve the sophisticated problems within automation. However, nowadays the transition from manual to automatic is actually undergoing gradually, a bit by a bit. Many early-bird researchers have started to transplant the AI theory and algorithms from computer science to GIScience, and a number of promising results have been achieved. In this session, we will invite speakers to talk about their experiences of using AI in geospatial information (GI) discovery. We will discuss all aspects of "AI for GI" such as the algorithms, technical frameworks, used tools & libraries, and model evaluation in various individual use case scenarios. How to Prepare for this Session: https://esip.figshare.com/articles/Geoweaver_for_Better_Deep_Learning_A_Review_of_Cyberinfrastructure/9037091
https://esip.figshare.com/articles/Some_Basics_of_Deep_Learning_in_Agriculture/7631615

Presentations:
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11626299.v1

View Recording: https://youtu.be/W0q8WiMw9Hs

Takeaways
  • There is a significant uptake of machine learning/artificial intelligence for earth science applications in the recent decade;
  • The challenge of machine learning applications for earth science domain includes:
    • the quality and availability of training data sets;
    • Requires a team with diverse skill background to implement the application
    • Need better understanding of the underlying mechanism of ML/AI models
  • There are many promising applications/ developments on streamlining the process and application of machine learning applications for different sectors of the society (weather monitoring, emergency responses, social good)



Speakers
avatar for Yuhan (Douglas) Rao

Yuhan (Douglas) Rao

Postdoctoral Research Scholar, CISESS/NCICS/NCSU
avatar for Aimee Barciauskas

Aimee Barciauskas

Data engineer, Development Seed
avatar for Annie Burgess

Annie Burgess

ESIP Lab Director, ESIP
avatar for Rahul Ramachandran

Rahul Ramachandran

Project Manager, Sr. Research Scientist, NASA
avatar for Ziheng Sun

Ziheng Sun

Research Assistant Professor, George Mason University
My research interests are mainly on geospatial cyberinfrastructure and agricultural remote sensing.


Wednesday January 8, 2020 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Salon A-C
  Salon A-C, Breakout

2:00pm EST

Advancing Data Integration approaches of the structured data web
Political, economic, social or scientific decision making is often based on integrated data from multiple sources across potentially many disciplines. To be useful, data need to be easy to discover and integrate.
This session will feature presentations highlighting recent breakthroughs and lessons learned from experimentation and implementation of open knowledge graph, linked data concepts and Discrete Global Grid Systems. Practicality and adoptability will be the emphasis - focusing on incremental opportunities that enable transformational capabilities using existing technologies. Best practices from the W3C Spatial Data on the Web Working Group, OGC Environmental Linked Features Interoperability Experiment, ESIP Science on Schema.org; implementation examples from Geoscience Australia, Ocean Leadership Consortium, USGS and other organisations will featured across the entire session.
This session will highlight how existing technologies and best practices can be combined to address important and common use cases that have been difficult if not impossible until recent developments. A follow up session will be used to seed future collaborative development through co-development, github issue creation, and open documentation generation.

How to Prepare for this Session: Review: https://opengeospatial.github.io/ELFIE/, https://github.com/ESIPFed/science-on-schema.org, https://www.w3.org/TR/sdw-bp/, and http://locationindex.org/.

Notes, links, and attendee contact info here.

View Recording: https://youtu.be/-raMt2Y1CdM

Session Agenda:
1.  2.00- 2.10,  Sylvain Grellet, Abdelfettah Feliachi, BRGM, France
'Linked data' the glue within interoperable information systems
“Our Environmental Information Systems are exposing environmental features, their monitoring systems and the observation they generate in an interoperable way (technical and semantic) for years. In Europe, there is even a legal obligation to such practices via the INSPIRE directive. However, the practice inducing data providers to set up services in a "Discovery > View > Download data" pattern hides data behind the services. This hinders data discovery and reuse. Linked Data on the Web Best Practices put this stack upside down and data is now back in the first line. This completely revamp the design and capacities of our Information Systems. We'll highlight the new data frontiers opened by such practices taking examples on the French National Groundwater Information Network”
View Slides: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11550570.v1

2.  2.10 - 2.20,  Adam Leadbetter, Rob Thomas, Marine Institute, Ireland
Using RDF Data Cubes for data visualization: an Irish pilot study for publishing environmental data to the semantic web
The Irish Wave and Weather Buoy Networks return metocean data at 5-60 minute intervals from 9 locations in the seas around Ireland. Outside of the Earth Sciences an example use case for these data is in supporting Blue Economy development and growth (e.g. renewable energy device development). The Marine Institute, as the operator of the buoy platforms, in partnership with the EU H2020 funded Open Government Intelligence project has published daily summary data from these buoys using the RDF DataCube model[1]. These daily statistics are available as Linked Data via a SPARQL endpoint making these data semantically interoperable and machine readable. This API underpins a pilot dashboard for data exploration and visualization. The dashboard presents the user with the ability to explore the data and derive plots for the historic summary data, while interactively subsetting from the full resolution data behind the statistics. Publishing environmental data with these technologies makes accessing environmental data available to developers outside those with Earth Science involvement and effectively lowers the entry bar for usage to those familiar with Linked Data technologies.
View Slides: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11550570.v1

3. 2.20 - 2.30,  Boyan Brodaric, Eric Boisvert, Geological Survey of Canada, Canada; David Blodgett, USGS, USA
Toward a Linked Water Data Infrastructure for North America
We will describe progress on a pilot project using Linked Data approaches to connect a wide variety of water-related information within Canada and the US, as well as across the shared border
View Slides: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11541984.v1

4.  2.30 - 2.40,  Dalia Varanka, E. Lynn Usery, USGS, USA
The Map as Knowledge Base; Integrating Linked Open Topographic Data from The National Map of the U.S. Geological Survey
This presentation describes the objectives, models, and approaches for a prototype system for cross-thematic topographic data integration based on semantic technology. The system framework offers a new perspectives on conceptual, logical, and physical system integration in contrast to widely used geographic information systems (GIS).
View Slides: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11541615.v1

5.  2.40 – 2.50,  Alistair Ritchie, Landcare, New Zealand
ELFIE at Landcare Research, New Zealand
Landcare Research, a New Zealand Government research institute, creates, manages and publishes a large set of observational and modelling data describing New Zealand’s land, soil, terrestrial biodiversity and invasive species. We are planning to use the findings of the ELFIE initiatives to guide the preparation of a default view of the data to help discovery (by Google), use (by web developers) and integration (into the large environmental data commons managed by other agencies). This integration will not only link data about the environment together, but will also expose more advanced data services. Initial work is focused on soil observation data, and the related scientific vocabularies, but we anticipate near universal application across our data holdings.
View Slides: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11550369.v1

6.  2.50 - 3.00,  Irina Bastrakova, Geoscience Australia, Australia
Location Index Project (Loc-I) – integration of data on people, business & the environment
Location Index (Loc-I) is a framework that provides a consistent way to seamlessly integrate data on people, business, and the environment.
Location Index aims to extend the characteristics of the foundation spatial data of taking geospatial data (multiple geographies) which is essential to support public safety and wellbeing, or critical for a national or government decision making that contributes significantly to economic, social and environmental sustainability and linking it with observational data. Through providing the infrastructure to suppo

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Yu

Jonathan Yu

Research data scientist/architect, CSIRO
Jonathan is a data scientist/architect with the Environmental Informatics group in CSIRO. He has expertise in information and web architectures, data integration (particularly Linked Data), data analytics and visualisation. Dr Yu is currently the technical lead for the Loc-I project... Read More →
avatar for Dalia Varanka

Dalia Varanka

Research Physical Scientist, U.S. Geological Survey
Principle Investigator and Project Lead, The Map as Knowledge Base
AR

Alastair Richie

Landcare Research NZ
AL

Adam Leadbetter

Marine Institute
RT

Rob Thomas

Marine Institute
BB

Boyan Brodaric

Natural Resources Canada
EB

Eric Boisvert

Natural Resources Canada
avatar for Irina  Bastrakova

Irina Bastrakova

Director, Spatial Data Architecture, Geoscience Australia
I have been actively involved with international and national geoinformatics communities for more than 19 years. I am the Chair of the Australian and New Zealand Metadata Working Group. My particular interest is in developing and practical application of geoscientific and geospatial... Read More →
avatar for David Blodgett

David Blodgett

U.S. Geological Survey


Wednesday January 8, 2020 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
White Flint

4:00pm EST

Emerging EnviroSensing Topics: Long-range, Low-power, Non-contact, Open-source Sensor Networks
Led by the ESIP EnviroSensing Cluster, this session is open to scientists, information managers, and technologists interested in the general topic of environmental sensing for science and management.

Rapid advances and decreasing costs in technology, as applied to environmental sensing systems, are promoting a shift from sparsely-distributed, single-mission observations toward employing affordable, high-fidelity, ecosystem monitoring networks driven by a need to forecast outcomes across timescales. In this session we will hear talks on new approaches to standing up long-range, low-power monitoring networks; the value(s) added by non-contact sensing (local-remote to satellite based sensing); as well as innovative sensor developments, including open-source approaches, that promote connectivity. The session will conclude with a 20-minute topical discussion open to all in attendance. How to Prepare for this Session:

List of speakers and presentation titles for this session:
  • Jacqueline Le Moigne: NASA
    Future Earth Science Measurements Using New Observing Strategies
  • David Coyle: USGS
    USGS NGWOS LPWAN Experiment: Leveraging LoRaWAN Sensor Platform Technologies
  • James Gallagher: OPeNDAP
    Sensors in Snowy Alpine Environments: Sensor Networks with LoRa, Progress Report
    View Slides: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11555784.v1 
  • Daniel Fuka: Va Tech
    Making Drones Interesting Again
    View Slides: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11663718.v1
  • Joseph Bell: USGS
    Deep-dive discussion after presentations. A topic of interest is documenting test efforts and the publication of peer-reviewed Test Reports

View Recording: https://youtu.be/dXTLqt-5Ai8

Takeaways
  • As monitoring expands across agencies and from point measures on the surface of the earth to monitoring using networks of satellites in space (internet of space) there is a growing need to increase communication among agencies and instrumentation alike
  • Inexpensive monitoring equipment is becoming readily available with large gains being made in the areas of function, reliability, and resolution/accuracy.
    • Market disruption
    • Edge -Computing (is this the current form of SDI-12-style monitoring?) local processing and storage, transmission of small/tiny data payloads
  • There appears to be a need across disciplines and agencies for a peer-reviewed test reports
    • Not resource intensive to publish
    • Available to all users (FAIR)
    • Provides details on test plan and provides test data whenever applicable.


Speakers
avatar for Joseph Bell

Joseph Bell

Hydrologist, USGS


Wednesday January 8, 2020 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Forest Glen
  Forest Glen, Breakout

4:00pm EST

Structured data web and coverages integration working session
This working session will follow on the "Advancing Data Integration approaches of the structured data web” session and the Coverage Analytics sprint as an opportunity for those interested in building linked data information products that integrate spatial features, coverage data, and more. As such, inspiration will be drawn from projects like science on schema.org, the Environmental Linked Features Interoperability Experiment, the Australian Location Index, and those that session attendees take part in. Participants will self organize into use-case or technology focused groups to discuss and synthesize the outcomes of the sprint and structured data web session. Session outcomes could take a number of forms: linked data and web page mock ups, ideas and issues for OGC, W3C, or ESIP groups to consider, example data or use cases for relevant software development projects to consider, or work plans and proposals for suture ESIP work. The session format is expected to be fluid with an ideation and group formation exercise followed by structured discussion to explore a set of ideas then narrow on a focused valuable outcome. Participants will be encouraged to work together prior to the meeting to design and plan the session structure. Outcomes of the session will be reported at an Information Technology and Interoperability webinar in early 2020. How to Prepare for this Session: Attend the coverage sprint and the "Advancing Data Integration approaches of the structured data web" session.

Shared document for session here.

Full Notes: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11559087.v1

Presentations:

View Recording: https://youtu.be/u2x3I0cr46A

  • Takeaways
    Breakout session information interoperability committee and webinar series. See notes: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LpcTMwP0mAD4G4Gb8mStI5uSDV61_qWPUkQ9nI1x1cI/edit?usp=sharing
  • Foster cross-project consistency via breakouts. Such as dealing with science on schema.org issue of Links to “in-band” linked (meta)data and “out of band” linked data. Content negotiation and in-band and out of band links Use blank nodes with link properties for rdf elements that are URI for out of band content. Identify in band links with sdo @id, out of band links with sdo:URL
  • Incorporating Spatial Coverages in Knowledge Graphs; Next Steps? Need to explore more on tessellations as an intermediate index. Will carry forward some of these ideas at the EDR SWG Will represent some of these ideas to the OGC-API Coverages SWG Will mention these ideas to the UFOKN Role of ‘spatial’ knowledge graphs Will spatial data analysis and transformation tools grow to adopt/support RDF as an underlying data structure for spatial information or will RDF continue to be a ‘view’ of existing (legacy) spatial data in GI systems?


Speakers
avatar for Adam Shepherd

Adam Shepherd

Technical Director, Co-PI, BCO-DMO
schema.org | Data Containerization | Linked Data | Semantic Web | Knowledge Representation | Ontologies
avatar for Irina  Bastrakova

Irina Bastrakova

Director, Spatial Data Architecture, Geoscience Australia
I have been actively involved with international and national geoinformatics communities for more than 19 years. I am the Chair of the Australian and New Zealand Metadata Working Group. My particular interest is in developing and practical application of geoscientific and geospatial... Read More →
WF

William Francis

Geoscience Australia
avatar for Jonathan Yu

Jonathan Yu

Research data scientist/architect, CSIRO
Jonathan is a data scientist/architect with the Environmental Informatics group in CSIRO. He has expertise in information and web architectures, data integration (particularly Linked Data), data analytics and visualisation. Dr Yu is currently the technical lead for the Loc-I project... Read More →
DF

Doug Fils

Consortium for Ocean Leadership
avatar for David Blodgett

David Blodgett

U.S. Geological Survey


Wednesday January 8, 2020 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
White Flint
 
Thursday, January 9
 

10:15am EST

Working Group for the Data Stewardship Committee
This session is a working group for the 2020-2021 year for the Data Stewardship committee. We will discuss priorities for the next year, potential collaborative outputs, and review the work in progress from the last year. 

Notes Document: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1B_0K5jGnFgH72U3P2-oGr5vEqHOGU8CWU-IkZ6pjXbM/edit?ts=5e174588

Presentations

View Recording: https://youtu.be/am-ZLfHgM4w

Takeaways
  • Wow, the members of the Committee really are active! Practically everyone has their own cluster or two!
  • Six activities proposed for the upcoming year have champions who will lead the effort to define the outputs of their selected activity.


Speakers
avatar for Alexis Garretson

Alexis Garretson

Community Fellow, ESIP
avatar for Kelsey Breseman

Kelsey Breseman

Archiving Program Lead, Environmental Data & Governance Initiative
Governmental accountability around public data & the environment. Decentralized web. Intersection of tech & ethics & civics.


Thursday January 9, 2020 10:15am - 11:45am EST
Forest Glen
  Forest Glen, Business Meeting

12:00pm EST

Hands-on labeling workshop
Intended as a follow on to the "Do You Have a Labeling Problem?" session and to get your feet wet, this working session is for people to experiment with two of the tools presented in that session, Labelimg and Bokeh. Presenters will provide some sample data for participants to work with. Attendees can also bring some of their own data to work with in the time remaining after the planned activities.

It would be best for workshop participants to preinstall Labelimg before coming to the session.   Regarding Bokeh, Anaconda is providing 25 accounts for workshop participants. (Thank you, Jim and Anaconda!).  Installing Bokeh is also an option.  Links for getting these tools are:
  • Labelimg via https://github.com/tzutalin/labelImg#installation
  • Bokeh as part of the HoloViz suite via http://holoviz.org/installation.html

Presentations

View Recording: https://youtu.be/y8NqTLgT8Ao

Takeaways


Speakers
avatar for Ziheng Sun

Ziheng Sun

Research Assistant Professor, George Mason University
My research interests are mainly on geospatial cyberinfrastructure and agricultural remote sensing.
avatar for Anne Wilson

Anne Wilson

Senior Software Engineer, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
avatar for Yuhan (Douglas) Rao

Yuhan (Douglas) Rao

Postdoctoral Research Scholar, CISESS/NCICS/NCSU


Thursday January 9, 2020 12:00pm - 1:30pm EST
Glen Echo
  Glen Echo, Workshop

12:00pm EST

Research Object Citation Cluster Working Session
ESIP has published guidelines for citing data and for citing software and services. These have been important and influential ESIP products. Now a new cluster is working to address the issues of “research object” citation writ large. The cluster has been working to identify the various types of research objects that could or should be cited such as samples, instruments, annotations, and other artifacts. We have also been examining the various concerns that may be addressed in citing the objects such as access, credit or attribution, and scientific reproducibility. We find that citation of different types of objects may need to address different concerns and that different approaches may be necessary for different concerns and objects. We have, therefore, been working through a matrix that attempts to map all the various objects and citation concerns.

In this working session, we will provide a brief overview of the cluster's work to date on determining when different research objects get IDs. We will then work in small groups to determine when different research objects need to be identified to ensure reproducibility or validity of a result. For this purpose, we define reproducibility as the ability to independently recreate or confirm a result (not the data). A result could be a finding in a scientific paper, a legal brief, a policy recommendation, a model output or derived product — essentially any formal, testable assertion. This is essentially a provenance use case. It is very broad, but distinct from the credit and even the access concerns of citation. This is primarily about unambiguous reference. When does an object become a first-class research object?
To approach the problem, we will break up into 4-5 groups to define and give examples of different clusters of research objects and then work to answer When or under what circumstance is it necessary to identify an object to enable reproducibility. 
Potential groups include:
  1. Literature and related objects (not to be discussed)
  2. Software and related objects — Dan Katz
  3. Data and related objects — Mark Parsons
  4. Samples — Sarah Ramdeen
  5. Ontologies and vocabularies — Ruth Duerr
  6. Complex research objects (esp. but not exclusively learning resources) — Nancy Hoebelheinrich
  7. Instruments and facilites — Mike Daniels
  8. Organizations 
  9. Activities
We encourage everyone  to start drafting definitions and examples in the spreadsheet now: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1VEYPLgTsCR_zbMUbThonBrqaYqBiMT4e525NzFi7ql8/edit#gid=1494916301
Our goal is to have a draft recommendation or complete matrix by the end of the meeting as well as potential follow-on activities for the cluster.

How to Prepare for this Session: Participants should be familiar with existing ESIP citation guidelines and have reviewed the minutes of the last several meetings, especially the "Objects and Concerns Matrix". See http://wiki.esipfed.org/index.php/Research_Object_Citation

Presentations

View Recording:
https://youtu.be/5MXzBLu7hjg (abbreviated due to breakout group emphasis of session).

Takeaways
  • What is a ‘thing’? ‘Research object’ is a defined term in other communities. Our conception is broader. Perhaps we need a new term, but much of the issue is defining when something becomes a ‘thing’ that is named and located.
  • The particular citation use case matters a lot. Reproducibility demands different considerations than credit. The cluster will consider more use cases.
  • There appears to be classes of things that can be treated similarly, but we haven’t sorted that out yet.



Speakers
avatar for Jessica Hausman

Jessica Hausman

Data Engineer, PO.DAAC JPL
avatar for Mark Parsons

Mark Parsons

Editor in Chief, Data Science Journal


Thursday January 9, 2020 12:00pm - 1:30pm EST
Linden Oak
  Linden Oak, Working Session

12:00pm EST

Datacubes for Analysis-Ready Data: Standards & State of the Art
This workshop session will follow up on the OGC Coverage Analytics sprint, focusing specifically on advanced services for spatio-temporal datacubes. In the Earth sciences datacubes are accepted as an enabling paradigm for offering massive spatio-temporal Earth data analysis-ready, more generally: easing access, extraction, analysis, and fusion. Also, datacubes homogenizes APIs across dimensions, allowing unified wrangling of 1-D sensor data, 2-D imagery, 3-D x/y/t image timeseries and x/y/z geophysics voxel data, and 4-D x/y/z/t climate and weather data.
Based on the OGC datacube reference implementation we introduce datacube concepts, state of standardization, and real-life 2D, 3D, and 4D examples utilizing services from three continents. Ample time will be available for discussion, and Internet-connected participants will be able to replay and modify many of the examples shown. Further, key datacube activities worldwide, within and beyond Earth sciences, will be related to.
Session outcomes could take a number of forms: ideas and issues for OGC, ISO, or ESIP to consider; example use cases; challenges not yet addressed sufficiently, and entirely novel use cases; work and collaboration plans for future ESIP work. Outcomes of the session will be reported at the next OGC TC meeting's Big Data and Coverage sessions. How to Prepare for this Session: Introductory and advanced material is available from http://myogc.org/go/coveragesDWG

Presentations
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11562552.v1

View Recording: https://youtu.be/82WG7soc5bk

Takeaways
  • Abstract coverage construct defines the base which can be filled up with a coverage implementation schema. Important as previously implementation wasn’t interoperable with different servers and clients. 
  • Have embedded the coordinate system retrieved from sensors reporting in real time into their xml schema to be able to integrate the sensor data into the broader system. Can deliver the data in addition to GML but JSON, and RDF which could be used to link into semantic web tech. 
  • Principle is send HTTP url-encoded query to server and get some results that are extracted from datacube, e.g., sources from many hyperspectral images.

Speakers

Thursday January 9, 2020 12:00pm - 1:30pm EST
White Flint