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Forest Glen [clear filter]
Tuesday, January 7
 

11:00am EST

FAIR Metadata Recommendations
We will discuss the FAIR metadata recommendations that were introduced at the ESIP Summer Meeting. How to Prepare for this Session: Use git repository: Issues

Links:
Glossary
Use git repository: 
Issues

View Recording:https://youtu.be/5hwZOLQ1p9M.

Takeaways
  • NCEAS is continuing to work on pinning down what are the fundamental characteristics for FAIR data. Have the suite of checks (e.g. is title present). 54 are currently implemented and they are working toward a community define 1.0 check suite. This is a good tool for data curators but has the potential to be misunderstood or misused - need a public FAIR metric. Public FAIR metric is high level and simple and includes only items that everyone agrees upon.
  • Future plans to create community specific custom FAIR suite checks to handle the variability of how metadata is hosted. Continually evaluating if checks are helping/hurting the data curators. Work is needed on the user interface - how do we ensure that metadata evaluation is a positive experience regardless of the score.
  • Reusability is typically low throughout the data repositories. Accessibility needs a greater focus as it’s hindered by broken/missing links. “When you decide what fields are mandatory (vs optional) you decide what metadata you get”


Speakers
avatar for Ted Habermann

Ted Habermann

Chief Game Changer, Metadata Game Changers
I am interested in all facets of metadata needed to discover, access, use, and understand data of any kind. Also evaluation and improvement of metadata collections, translation proofing. Ask me about the Metadata Game.
avatar for Matt Jones

Matt Jones

Director, DataONE Program, DataONE, UC Santa Barbara
DataONE | Arctic Data Center | Open Science | Provenance and Semantics | Scientific Synthesis


Tuesday January 7, 2020 11:00am - 12:30pm EST
Forest Glen
  Forest Glen, Breakout

2:00pm EST

Making a Good First Impression: Metadata Quality Metrics for Earth Observation Data and Information
Metadata is often the first information that a user interacts with when looking for data. Understanding that there is typically only one chance to make a good impression, data and information repositories have placed an emphasis on metadata quality as a way of increasing the likelihood that a user will have a favorable first impression. This session will explore quality metrics, badging or scoring, and metadata quality assessment approaches within the Earth observation community. Discussion questions include:
● Does your organization implement metadata quality metrics and/or scores?
○ What are the key metrics that the scores are based on?
○ What priorities are driving your metadata quality metrics? For example, different repositories have different priorities. These priorities can include an emphasis on discoverability, accessibility, usability, provenance, etc...
● Does your organization make metadata quality scores publically viewable? What are the pros and cons of making the scores publically accessible?
How to Prepare for this Session:

Presentations:
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11553606.v1
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11551182.v1

View Recording: https://youtu.be/lbza3gEHmtQ

Takeaways
  • Visualizations of the metadata quality metrics need to be easily understood or well documented to be effective
  • There are diverse ideas and current metrics that are being rolled out soon (U.S. Global Change Research Program & NCA)
  • Ensuring that metrics interact with existing standards such as FAIR is also important

Speakers
avatar for Amrutha Elamparuthy

Amrutha Elamparuthy

GCIS Data Manager, U.S. Global Change Research Program


Tuesday January 7, 2020 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Forest Glen
  Forest Glen, Breakout

4:00pm EST

Bringing Science Data Uncertainty Down to Earth - Sub-orbital, In Situ, and Beyond
In the Fall of 2019, the Information Quality Cluster (IQC) published a white paper entitled “Understanding the Various Perspectives of Earth Science Observational Data Uncertainty”. The intention of this paper is to provide a diversely sampled exposition of both prolific and unique policies and practices, applicable in an international context of diverse policies and working groups, made toward quantifying, characterizing, communicating and making use of uncertainty information throughout the diverse, cross-disciplinary Earth science data landscape; to these ends, the IQC addressed uncertainty information from the following four perspectives: Mathematical, Programmatic, User, and Observational. These perspectives affect policies and practices in a diverse international context, which in turn influence how uncertainty is quantified, characterized, communicated and utilized. The IQC is now in a scoping exercise to produce a follow-on paper that is intended to provide a set of recommendations and best practices regarding uncertainty information. It is our hope that we can consider and examine additional areas of opportunity with regard to the cross-domain and cross-disciplinary aspects of Earth science data. For instance, the existing white paper covers uncertainty information from the perspective of satellite-based remote sensing well, but does not adequately address the in situ or airborne (i.e., sub-orbital) perspective. This session intends to explore such opportunities to expand the scope of the IQC’s awareness of what is being done with regard to uncertainty information, while also providing participants and observers with an opportunity to weigh in on how best to move forward with the follow-on paper. How to Prepare for this Session:Agenda:
  1. "IQC Uncertainty White Paper Status Summary and Next Steps" - Presented by: David Moroni (15 minutes)
  2. "Uncertainty quantification for in situ ocean data: The S-MODE sub-orbital campaign" - Presented by: Fred Bingham (15 minutes)
  3. "Uncertainty Quantification for Spatio-Temporal Mapping of Argo Float Data" - Presented by Mikael Kuusela (20 minutes)
  4. Panel Discussion (35 minutes)
  5. Closing Comments (5 minutes)
Notes Page: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1vfYBK_DLTAt535kMZusTPVCBAjDqptvT0AA5D6oWrEc/edit?usp=sharing

Presentations:
https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11553681.v1

View Recording: https://youtu.be/vC2O8FRgvck

Takeaways

Speakers
avatar for David Moroni

David Moroni

Data Stewardship and User Services Team Lead, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center
I am a Senior Science Data Systems Engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Data Stewardship and User Services Team Lead for the PO.DAAC Project, which provides users with data stewardship services including discovery, access, sub-setting, visualization, extraction, documentation... Read More →
avatar for Ge Peng

Ge Peng

Research Scholar, CISESS/NCEI
Dataset-centric scientific data stewardship, data quality management
FB

Fred Bingham

University of North Carolina at Wilmington
MK

Mikael Kuusela

Carnegie Mellon University


Tuesday January 7, 2020 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Forest Glen
 
Wednesday, January 8
 

4:00pm EST

Emerging EnviroSensing Topics: Long-range, Low-power, Non-contact, Open-source Sensor Networks
Led by the ESIP EnviroSensing Cluster, this session is open to scientists, information managers, and technologists interested in the general topic of environmental sensing for science and management.

Rapid advances and decreasing costs in technology, as applied to environmental sensing systems, are promoting a shift from sparsely-distributed, single-mission observations toward employing affordable, high-fidelity, ecosystem monitoring networks driven by a need to forecast outcomes across timescales. In this session we will hear talks on new approaches to standing up long-range, low-power monitoring networks; the value(s) added by non-contact sensing (local-remote to satellite based sensing); as well as innovative sensor developments, including open-source approaches, that promote connectivity. The session will conclude with a 20-minute topical discussion open to all in attendance. How to Prepare for this Session:

List of speakers and presentation titles for this session:
  • Jacqueline Le Moigne: NASA
    Future Earth Science Measurements Using New Observing Strategies
  • David Coyle: USGS
    USGS NGWOS LPWAN Experiment: Leveraging LoRaWAN Sensor Platform Technologies
  • James Gallagher: OPeNDAP
    Sensors in Snowy Alpine Environments: Sensor Networks with LoRa, Progress Report
    View Slides: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11555784.v1 
  • Daniel Fuka: Va Tech
    Making Drones Interesting Again
    View Slides: https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11663718.v1
  • Joseph Bell: USGS
    Deep-dive discussion after presentations. A topic of interest is documenting test efforts and the publication of peer-reviewed Test Reports

View Recording: https://youtu.be/dXTLqt-5Ai8

Takeaways
  • As monitoring expands across agencies and from point measures on the surface of the earth to monitoring using networks of satellites in space (internet of space) there is a growing need to increase communication among agencies and instrumentation alike
  • Inexpensive monitoring equipment is becoming readily available with large gains being made in the areas of function, reliability, and resolution/accuracy.
    • Market disruption
    • Edge -Computing (is this the current form of SDI-12-style monitoring?) local processing and storage, transmission of small/tiny data payloads
  • There appears to be a need across disciplines and agencies for a peer-reviewed test reports
    • Not resource intensive to publish
    • Available to all users (FAIR)
    • Provides details on test plan and provides test data whenever applicable.


Speakers
avatar for Joseph Bell

Joseph Bell

Hydrologist, USGS


Wednesday January 8, 2020 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Forest Glen
  Forest Glen, Breakout